July 2009 Archives

Fat Mail

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I am going to work for Microsoft one day.

 

Clearly, those kids in Redmond need my help. The first project I'm going to take on is to improve the way Microsoft's mail client, Outlook, deals with archiving old messages.

 

The way the program works now, when your inbox reaches a certain size you get a dialogue box offering you the opportunity to archive your old messages with a single click of the OK button. So easy. One click and potentially thousands of messages cease to take up any room in your inbox whatsoever.

 

But where did they go?

 

You assume they're there ... somewhere. I mean, they've got to be somewhere or they wouldn't call it archiving; they'd call it deleting. OK, but not knowing where they went is annoying, so you turn that feature off. No more archiving of old messages. But then, as your computer ages, as YOU age and accumulate messages and attachments, and maybe you buy a new machine and you transfer all the messages from your old machine to your new one, eventually you come to a point where you've got a pretty weighty inbox.

 

If your inbox happens to be the property of the company you work for and is hooked up to a network server, you'll very likely begin bumping up against a mailbox size limit before that ever happens. You'll start getting automated messages from your system administrator warning you of the limit, then eventually any messages sent to you will bounce back to the sender.

 

When I go to work for Microsoft, I'm going to design a system to alleviate these issues. To start, I will automate the process of removing heavy attachments, which contribute to the total size of your inbox. I'll give you the option of "Delete all attachments," "Save all attachments to a file then delete from message," or the option to save and delete attachments one by one with your approval, much like the "Find Next" feature for Find and Replace in Microsoft Word.

 

Then I'm going to give you an archiving function that doesn't require a computer engineering degree to execute. It will be drag and drop. You will be able to drop your messages to the folder of your choosing. And if you want the messages back, you'll just have to drag them back into your inbox. It will work just the way the rest of your system works. Cut and paste. Move or copy.

 

This is just the beginning of my work with Microsoft. I've got other plans for Windows. I'm just waiting for them to call me with that job offer.

 

 

 

 

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About this Archive

This page is an archive of entries from July 2009 listed from newest to oldest.

June 2009 is the previous archive.

August 2009 is the next archive.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.